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The Resource We're not leaving : 9/11 responders tell their stories of courage, sacrifice, and renewal, Benjamin J. Luft

We're not leaving : 9/11 responders tell their stories of courage, sacrifice, and renewal, Benjamin J. Luft

Label
We're not leaving : 9/11 responders tell their stories of courage, sacrifice, and renewal
Title
We're not leaving
Title remainder
9/11 responders tell their stories of courage, sacrifice, and renewal
Statement of responsibility
Benjamin J. Luft
Title variation
We are not leaving
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
We're not leaving is a compilation of powerful first-person narratives told from the vantage point of World Trade Center disaster workers: police officers, firefighters, construction workers, and other volunteers at the site
Biography type
autobiography
Cataloging source
HU9
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Luft, Benjamin J
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • September 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001
  • Terrorism
Target audience
adult
Label
We're not leaving : 9/11 responders tell their stories of courage, sacrifice, and renewal, Benjamin J. Luft
Instantiates
Publication
Contents
  • pt. 1. Caught in the collapse. We're not leaving: Carol, NYPD, one of the first officers on the scene
  • Run for your life: Philip, NYC Department of Buildings inspector, found himselrf amid chaos after assessing damaged buildings
  • Am I dead?: Jack, NY, Presbyterian Hospital, Director of EMS, accompanied his crew to the burning towers
  • They were all killed: Michael, NYPD, thirty-one-year veteran who was on his beat at the World Trade Center during the attacks
  • Lucky to be alive: Robert, accountant and veteran Long Island volunteer firefighter, left his Manhattan office to guide the injured to safety
  • Where are the patients?: Marvin, paramedic, escaped the first collapse, then the second
  • She saved me: Tyree, Supreme Court officer, survived the collapse of tower 2 with burn victim Doris --
  • pt. 2. Looking for survivors. Searching for my brother: James, volunteer firefighter, searched for Linc, a brother firefighter
  • Digging with our hands: John, FDNY, captain and thirty-three-year veteran who lost many friends
  • Ironworkers desperately needed: John, ironworker, describes the role of union workers at the site
  • Cutting and torching: Demetrius, welder, applied his skills to assist in the rescue effort
  • The rescue dogs: Thomas, police officer and K-9 handler, speaks of the impact on the dogs and their human handlers
  • It was the best sunrise: Richard, Nassau County ESU, helped rescue Port Authority cop John McLoughlin --
  • pt. 3. Recovery, recovery, recovery. I didn't deserve thanks: William, corrections officer, guarded a firehouse that lost almost all of its men
  • Am I a ghost?: Steve, telecommunications worker, reveals the spiritual impact of his experiences at Ground Zero
  • Couldn't pull myself away: Ronald, construction worker, a native Guyanan driven by his strong patriotism for America
  • The art of cleanups: Christopher, disaster cleanup, cleaned up hazardous contaminants
  • The dump: Michael, NYPD, recounts the horror of the Staten Island landfill
  • Hope was all we could give: Anthony, NYPD, was unprepared to deal with victims' families at the Bereavement Center
  • Burn-out: William, NYPD, the disaster was the coup de grãace of his career as an ESU officer
  • We hid and cried: Christine, NYPD, describes the emotional challenges confronting the responders --
  • pt. 4. The responders need help. The hands that heal: Terese, massage therapist, soothed first responders with medical massages
  • The church of refuge: Arthur, podiatrist, organized a makeshift clinic at St. Paul's Chapel
  • Faith renewed: Michael, NYPD, describes his spiritual descent and reawakening
  • To see it with your own eyes: Rafael, NYPD, stresses the importance of memorializing 9/11
  • It just builds up: Glen, NYPD, speaks to the long-term effects of his experiences as an ESU officer
  • The ugly branches: John, demolition, injured in the first week and became a forceful advocate for responders --
  • pt. 5. Renewal. The smell of death: Frank, psychiatrist, worked closely with responders on site and afterwards
  • Providing peer assistance: Bill, NYPD, founder of POPPA, the Police Organization Providing Peer Assistance
  • Learning lessons the hard way: Micki, union organizer, fought for responders' rights for adequate health care
  • A beacon of goodness: Father Mike, priest, comforted parishioners who lost loved ones on 9/11
  • A community of faith: Reverend Harris, priest, transformed his church into a refuge for first responders
  • A widow's love
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
xxi, 302 p.
Isbn
9780983237020
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
(OCoLC)ocn750211155
Label
We're not leaving : 9/11 responders tell their stories of courage, sacrifice, and renewal, Benjamin J. Luft
Publication
Contents
  • pt. 1. Caught in the collapse. We're not leaving: Carol, NYPD, one of the first officers on the scene
  • Run for your life: Philip, NYC Department of Buildings inspector, found himselrf amid chaos after assessing damaged buildings
  • Am I dead?: Jack, NY, Presbyterian Hospital, Director of EMS, accompanied his crew to the burning towers
  • They were all killed: Michael, NYPD, thirty-one-year veteran who was on his beat at the World Trade Center during the attacks
  • Lucky to be alive: Robert, accountant and veteran Long Island volunteer firefighter, left his Manhattan office to guide the injured to safety
  • Where are the patients?: Marvin, paramedic, escaped the first collapse, then the second
  • She saved me: Tyree, Supreme Court officer, survived the collapse of tower 2 with burn victim Doris --
  • pt. 2. Looking for survivors. Searching for my brother: James, volunteer firefighter, searched for Linc, a brother firefighter
  • Digging with our hands: John, FDNY, captain and thirty-three-year veteran who lost many friends
  • Ironworkers desperately needed: John, ironworker, describes the role of union workers at the site
  • Cutting and torching: Demetrius, welder, applied his skills to assist in the rescue effort
  • The rescue dogs: Thomas, police officer and K-9 handler, speaks of the impact on the dogs and their human handlers
  • It was the best sunrise: Richard, Nassau County ESU, helped rescue Port Authority cop John McLoughlin --
  • pt. 3. Recovery, recovery, recovery. I didn't deserve thanks: William, corrections officer, guarded a firehouse that lost almost all of its men
  • Am I a ghost?: Steve, telecommunications worker, reveals the spiritual impact of his experiences at Ground Zero
  • Couldn't pull myself away: Ronald, construction worker, a native Guyanan driven by his strong patriotism for America
  • The art of cleanups: Christopher, disaster cleanup, cleaned up hazardous contaminants
  • The dump: Michael, NYPD, recounts the horror of the Staten Island landfill
  • Hope was all we could give: Anthony, NYPD, was unprepared to deal with victims' families at the Bereavement Center
  • Burn-out: William, NYPD, the disaster was the coup de grãace of his career as an ESU officer
  • We hid and cried: Christine, NYPD, describes the emotional challenges confronting the responders --
  • pt. 4. The responders need help. The hands that heal: Terese, massage therapist, soothed first responders with medical massages
  • The church of refuge: Arthur, podiatrist, organized a makeshift clinic at St. Paul's Chapel
  • Faith renewed: Michael, NYPD, describes his spiritual descent and reawakening
  • To see it with your own eyes: Rafael, NYPD, stresses the importance of memorializing 9/11
  • It just builds up: Glen, NYPD, speaks to the long-term effects of his experiences as an ESU officer
  • The ugly branches: John, demolition, injured in the first week and became a forceful advocate for responders --
  • pt. 5. Renewal. The smell of death: Frank, psychiatrist, worked closely with responders on site and afterwards
  • Providing peer assistance: Bill, NYPD, founder of POPPA, the Police Organization Providing Peer Assistance
  • Learning lessons the hard way: Micki, union organizer, fought for responders' rights for adequate health care
  • A beacon of goodness: Father Mike, priest, comforted parishioners who lost loved ones on 9/11
  • A community of faith: Reverend Harris, priest, transformed his church into a refuge for first responders
  • A widow's love
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
xxi, 302 p.
Isbn
9780983237020
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
(OCoLC)ocn750211155

Library Locations

    • Lawrenceville BranchBorrow it
      1001 Lawrenceville Highway, Lawrenceville, GA, 30046-4707, US
      33.942073 -84.013025
    • Hamilton Mill BranchBorrow it
      3690 Braselton Highway, Dacula, GA, 30019, US
      34.06974 -83.901807
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